Three Days in Jeju

This summer we went to Jeju. Jeju is kind of like the Risa of Korea.

We started in Jeju city where the airport is. With a rental car, we drove to Manjanggul caves.  These are a volcanically formed network of tubes that you can walk through, it takes about 20-30 minutes to walk the whole route there and back. It was pretty cool, and only 2000 W entry, although it was quite chilly down there.

Next, we drove towards our hotel (Co-op city hotel) which was close to the foot of Seongsan Ilchulbong., the bowl-shaped mountain formed by a volcanic eruption. The roof of the hotel has a rooftop bar and some jacuzzis which you can rent for 30 mins, but most impressively it has a beautiful view of the mountain.

In the morning we walked up Seongsang ilchulbong. It is quite an easy walk but takes about two hours especially if you stop for photo ops. The summit has an impressive view of the interior of the bowl, and on your way back down you get some lovely views of Jeju.

For the rest of the day, we drove around the coast of Jeju and made stops at a couple of waterfalls. The first was Jeonbang falls, its claim to fame is that it is the only waterfall in Asia that falls directly into the ocean. It is really impressive, you walk around the bottom of it and paddle in the water where the waterfall mixes with the ocean water.  The second was cheonjiyeon falls, which has a very nice walk leading up to it. The waterfall itself is quite impressive and scenic, but not as dramatic as the Jeonbang falls. After that, we went to our hotel near sanbangsan mountain.

On the last morning, we went to a neat little spa, Sanbangsan hot springs. It is quite similar to most Koren spas but it also has some baths which are heated by a volcanic hot spring and is filled with carbonated water. They also have outdoor swimming pools and baths with the carbonated water. On our way back to Jeju city we stopped by a beach for lunch and a walk; the beach was beautiful with white sands and black volcanic rock.

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We didn’t have time to go to see the lava columns. We also didn’t hike up  Mt. Hallasan mainly because that will probably take up most of a day and it was the height of summer too.

Jeju is definitely worth a visit at least once if you are staying in Korea for a reasonable amount of time. Although it has a lot of tourist attractions/museums (such as a teddy bear museum, a sex museum, and mysterious road), it is the areas of outstanding natural beauty that make it special. Three days is probably enough to see everything if you plan your time well; if you want to see Mt Hallasan, then add an extra day. Renting a car is also a good idea, so you don’t have to rely on the buses.

 

 

 

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Cherry Blossom Season 2017

The start of the warm weather and springtime brings Cherry Blossom season in Korea. We went to Yeongildae Park near Postech to walk around see the Cherry Blossoms. It wasn’t quite that dramatic this year, the colder weather meant that the trees bloomed at different rates. Last year they all seemed to bloom at once.

It was a little bit past peak bloom when we went but we still got some pretty pictures of the cherry blossoms and the pond.

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New Paper: Enrichment of Specifically Labeled Protein Using an Immobilized Host Molecule

A paper detailing some of the work that I have being doing in Korea has recently been published in Angewandte Chemie.

The paper describes how high affinity host-guest complexes can be used in proteomic studies to enrich target proteins. The synthetic host-guest complexes have similar affinity to high affinity complexes typically used in the life sciences (Biotin-streptavidin). Unlike the protein based complexes, the synthetic system can be dissociated under mild conditions simply by adding a higher affinity guest.

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Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/anie.201611894/abstract

Review 2016

2016 was a year where everything changed, mostly for the better, for me both personally and professionally. I rolled the dice by moving 5000 miles to start a job as a postdoc in Korea to be with someone I’d only known from the internet, and a short vacation together in South Korea last summer. Looking back, it seems a little foolhardy, but a year later I’m engaged to that person and my career has developed here much faster than it was doing in the UK 2015. There’s probably a decent Toastmasters speech to be made from this year somewhere down the line. Here’s a short reviewer of other things that have happened this year.

January started at Chris’ new year’s murder mystery party and recovery steak the next day. On January 2, Meg arrived for her vacation in the UK. It had been 5 months since we had last seen each other in Korea. Together, we visited London, Edinburgh, Leeds, Newcastle, and Carlisle. On January 20 we left for Korea.

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Meg at Kings Cross; Leaving party in Leeds (photo credit: Chris); and my last supper in the UK.

In February, I started my new job as a postdoc at the Institute for Basic Science (the unintentionally chuckle-worthy, IBS). Meg and I took a trip to Busan.

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Gwangali Beach, Busan

In March, we took a trip to Seoul. We went up Namsan Tower and ate Alabama BBQ in Itaewon.

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Alabama BBQ in Seoul, Namsan Tower view.

In April, is the cherry blossom season in Korea, My lab went on a picnic at to a local park.

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POSTECH campus in the Cherry Blossom Season; The center for Self-assembly and Complexity group picnic.

Nothing interesting happened in May or June!

In July, I returned to Seoul for the Supramolecular and Materials Chemistry Conference, which included a trip to Gyeongbokgung Palace. The weekend before we tried out an escape room in Seoul.

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Part of Gyeongbokgung Palace

In August, I visited the United States. After a layover in San Francisco, I moved on to Tennessee to visit Meg’s family.  In Tennessee, we visited the Jack Daniels distillery. We also had a 3 day trip to Washington DC, via Knoxville. During my time in the US, I got a few things off my bucket list: I went skydiving and got to experience the US constitution’s 2nd amendment.

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Me with an AK-47; the view from the Lincoln Memorial; Meg and I at the Whitehouse

In September, we went to Eonyang for the Eonyang Bulgogi festival. Korea experienced its 1st and 4th strongest recorded earthquakes within an hour of each other.

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Raw beef (left) and Eonyang bulgogi (right)

In October, southern South Korea was hit by a typhoon.  We visited a beach near Ulsan. I went to Busan for the Korean Chemical Society Fall Meeting.

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In November, we visited the Eonyang amethyst caves. I went to my first Thanksgiving dinner with friends.

In December, we had we visited Ganjelgot cape, famous for being the place where the sun rises the earliest on the Korean Peninsula and the home of Korea’s largest postbox. On Christmas day we went to Busan for the Christmas tree festival. Meg and I got engaged.

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The largest postbox in Korea; Meg and I (back in April, but it’s the best picture of us)

Korean Food Part 1

 

One of the best things about living in Korea is the food. Like many Asian cultures, food is traditionally shared in Korea. Often the main will be cooked in the center of the table  There are many side dishes (Banchan, 반찬) with most Korean meals. Kimchi 김치 is ubiquitous, often with many other types of fermented vegetable too.

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sidedishes from a Korean restaurant.

Here are a few of the foods that I like:

Korean BBQ

One of the distinctive thinks about Korean food compared to western is that in some restaurants your meat is brought to your table raw and you barbecue it yourself. You can get many different cuts of meat, from belly pork at the cheaper end to Wagyu steaks at the more expensive.  The cooked meat is normally eaten by wrapping in a salad leaf with some other vegetables and sauce .

three different cuts of bbq meat (left), and Wagyu steaks (right).

Gamjatang  감자탕

Literally means potato soup, although there is often potato in it, is not the main component.  Gamjatang is pork backbone stew. It is very similar to rib meat, but it’s from the spine. Like many Korean dishes its supposed to be shared so there’s often served as a stew in the center of the table.

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Gamjatang

Dakgalbi 닭갈비

Literally means ‘chicken rib’ it’s actually chicken breast meat cooked in a spicy sauce, which often has noodles, rice cakes (ddeok, 떡), mushrooms and vegetables added. It is from a place a called Chooncheon the northern part of south Korea.  After you finish, normally the remaining sauce is cleared up with a portion of rice which is stir-fried into the remaining sauce. It’s delicious and filling. If there is one meal I think would do very well in the west, it would be dakgalbi. I doubt, though, you would be allowed to serve uncooked chicken in the UK. In Korea, it’s a popular meal and there some western fusion varieties where there it served with cheese fondue or cheese-filled rice cakes.

Traditional dakgalbi (left) and cheese ring version (right).

The Cost of Living in Korea as a Postdoc

Korea is much, much cheaper. Things just cost less out here. From public transport, eating out, health care. The quality might not be quite as high as some places in the West, but it is still good. Korea is certainly a little ‘rougher around the edges’, but in my opinion, the cost of living to quality of life is far better value out here. I can save around 2/3 of my paycheck most months, even when I eat out and travel.

Let’s look at some examples of where Korea’s cost of living is much cheaper than the in the West: Source for the numbers (I think these are quite Seoul-centric) and my personal experience. Numbers are in Korean Won, or USD (rule of thumb W 1000 = $1)

 Housing and utilities:  

Apartment rent is quite cheap, a single bedroom apartment in a city it can be around W 600,000 / month, less in smaller cities. In my experience, it’s a little cheaper than that, closer to W 300,000. On campus housing is cheaper still.

Utilities are quite cheap around W150, 000 per month according to the figures from Numbeo. I think that’s pretty reasonable compared the West. In my experience campus housing, usually bills you for rent and utilities together, I pay less than W 300 000 /month.

The one thing that is a little different is the deposit (Key money) which can be several thousand dollars, but like a deposit you get it back at the end of the tenancy.

Eating out

Korean food is usually less than 10, 000 per serving for most restaurants, Western food and more upmarket restaurants will set you back a bit more. If you eat mostly Korean, you will eat much cheaper. Beer is at most W 5000 for 0.5L bottle.

Public transport

The local buses are very cheap, you pay a single fare no matter how far you travel and it’s only $1-$1.50 depending on the city.

Subway. Some of the larger cities have a subway and the cost is comparable to the buses.

Taxis are a little bit more expensive, but they are still cheaper than other parts of the world.

Slow trains are the cheapest way to get between cities, although it is quite slow and the schedule can be quite sparse.

Buses. There are two classes, the intercity and the express buses. The intercity buses are the easiest way to get around. They are cheap and regular (every 10 mins between some cities). The express buses are good for getting to and from Seoul (or Incheon airport), they can take a bit of time (up to 6 hours to get across the country but are reasonably priced).

KTX The fastest way to get around is the high-speed train, the KTX. It is expensive for Korea but is still reasonable compared to western countries (you can traverse the country for around $60, in three hours). There’s complimentary wi-fi, too.

If you prefer to use a car, that’s possible too. Gas is very cheap and you can often pick up used car for ~1-3 million won from another expat who’s leaving. Another thing to note is compacts qualify for discounted parking, tolls and gas.

Healthcare

Healthcare costs are subsided by your insurance (either national or employer). A simple doctor’s visit is around W 10, 000. The cost is not the major difference between healthcare here and the UK for example. Hospitals operate on a walk-in basis, and you’ll normally get seen by a doctor quickly. If not, another hospital is probably not too far away.

Taxes

At the postdoc paygrade, income tax is 17% on everything after your first 10 million won. Other withholdings include pension contributions and health insurance. In total, withholdings are ~10% of the paycheck.

There are some things that are more expensive. These are mostly the imported or the seasonal goods. The cost of living is higher in Seoul, too.

Being a science PhD, your skill-set travels. Doing science is more or a less the same wherever you go in the world. So you can absolutely take into account economic considerations when deciding where you want to do a postdoc. The prestige of postdoc-ing in the US or some top labs in Europe means that there’s always going to be many more people trying to get in than there are jobs, which drives down your value. It’s a basic law of economics: Supply and demand.  There’s not much point in fighting against this, if you want to make maximum economic benefit from your skills, then you need to go look for where demand is high and or supply is low.

You can reach out to me if you have any questions about living and working in Korea as a scientist.